Keighley amputee 'stuck in his own home'

Amputee John Duffey at his home in West Lane, Keighley, where he is facing a long wait for adaptations which mean he can get out of the house on his own

Amputee John Duffey at his home in West Lane, Keighley, where he is facing a long wait for adaptations which mean he can get out of the house on his own

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A Keighley man left trapped in his own home after his leg was amputated is facing a long wait for disabled-access adaptations to his house.

West Lane resident John Duffey, 68, lost his right leg last September after developing a blood clot, and now uses a wheelchair.

His wife, Susan, said: “My husband is stuck in the house, and social services haven’t even assessed him yet. We’ve been told that he’s ‘on the list’, but that it could be another three or four months before he’s even assessed.

“My daughter and I had been lifting him over the threshold of the house. But now my daughter is poorly so is unable to help.

“My husband washes himself downstairs as we have no stairlift or any hand rails in the house. We don’t have the money for a stairlift, and he can’t get upstairs to use the bath. If there was a fire he wouldn’t be able to get outside.”

She said her family had tried to help her husband get upstairs on one occasion, but said this was far too arduous to attempt on a regular basis. She said: “We feel it is a bit much for him, and as I’m 60 and have to work part-time it’s also too much of a struggle for me.”

A fortnight ago, the Keighley News reported on how 74-year-old Riddlesden wheelchair user Thelma Franks was confined to her home, because of delays in carrying out adaptations. Mrs Franks survived a serious stroke in February 2012.

Responding to Mr Duffey’s situation, Janice Simpson, strategic director of Bradford Council's adult and community services, said: “We’re aware of Mr Duffey’s mobility problems, which mean he is unable to use stairs and get in and out of his home independently, and have made his case a priority.

“We’ll be visiting his home within four to six weeks to assess the situation, and will work with the family to get any necessary work done as quickly as possible.

“What work is carried out will depend on how complex the access issues are.

“We may need to provide a temporary solution while we assist the family in getting funding for the actual building work.”

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